Doing a Screen Capture Video – Test Run

I’m playing with the idea of doing video tutorials today.

Here’s a sample video screen capture showing how I organize my image files on the hard drive. There’s no audio, I don’t have a microphone, but I do have one on order.

My basic strategy for organizing thousands of image files is to store them in directories based on subject matter by year. Each directory then contains a sub-directory called “stock photos”, where I store jpg versions of the images that I have submitted to the stock agencies.

There’s more to it than this though. I do most of my organizing in Adobe Lightroom and I’ll be creating more involved tutorials once I get this mapped out and understand the best method of creating them.

For now, I created this video using a freeware program called “ScreenRec” and just saved it in mp4 format. Fairly basic stuff, but I’m liking the software and this is probably what I’ll be using as I move forward.

Something to do on a lazy Monday.

I Don’t Need No Instructions


Hanging out in the office doing computer upgrades today.

I build my own PC’s, always have. The current system is getting a little dated by modern standards, still running a generation 4, Intel i7 cpu motherboard, which has been doing quite well. I built this back in late 2014, and I’m certain the techno-geek scrutinizers would be shaking their head at me for my lack of maintaining a modern computer architecture.  So with that fear in the back of my head, coupled with the fact that Adobe Lightroom and Photoshop won’t recognize my old graphics card’s 3D setting, I felt it was time to update things a bit.

We do have a good computer store here in town called Micro Center. I don’t order computer parts off the internet unless it’s a last resort, as I don’t want to wait for days and then get a bad part, only to have to ship it back and wait more days. Micro Center stocks just about everything and the price with sales tax isn’t much more than online parts with shipping costs. Immediate satisfaction is better. I want some and I want it now!

I just installed a Gigabyte GeForce GTX 1650 graphics card and a new dual-band wireless LAN card. Went pretty smooth, but that graphics card is big and it clears my PC case by about 1/4 of an inch. That’s better than being too large by 1/4 of an inch. I’ll take it.

The network card was needed because I’ve had an old wireless card in the thing since day one and my wireless LAN does 5 ghz, which I’ve never utilized on anything but my iPhone and iPad. Doubled the wireless speed for 30 bucks. I’ll take it.

The big difference is the graphics/video speed now. I’ve upped my video performance by about 50% over the old Intel on-board chip set. Both monitors are now running via HDMI, which does a good enough job. I could actually consider this a cheap gaming system now, but I don’t play computer games.

Hopefully this will keep me going for another couple of years, at which time I’ll probably spring for a new motherboard and all the nice stuff current technology offers.

In the meantime, I’m humming along with zippier graphics, zippier networking and zippier hard disk (now using a SSD on the boot drive)

Not bad for an old fart. I can still tear a computer apart and build what-ever I need and I don’t need no instructions.