COVID-19 Hunker-down Log. Stardate 43960.27

Combating boredom. So few things, so much time. Here we are, two months into the hunker-down era and the pace of life has been less than hectic. Good thing? Bad Thing? It is what it is.

Most of my productive time is spent tinkering in the yard. I do have a couple of unfinished projects.

There is a new overhead kitchen light fixture on order, it’s been shipped and will probably be here early next week. Replacing the old florescent ceiling fixture with a new LED box. It doesn’t look too difficult, but it will require me to work overhead, which can sometimes be a bit of a pain, literally, in my bum shoulder. I think I can manage it though.

First on the list, and probably today, I need to replace the faucet on the kitchen sink. The existing faucet works okay, but the little stop thingy inside the cold water knob doesn’t stop so the knob spins 360 degrees. Non sequitur! The new faucet arrived a couple of days ago and it’s sitting on the kitchen counter to remind me (and the wife) that it needs to be installed. Hope to have that task done by noon, mind and motivation provided.

Hope to get started on scraping off the redwood deck. Start high, work my way down to the horizontal surface. When I played with the power washer the other day I noticed that there is quite a bit of old stain flaking off in rather large chunks. The scraping is going to be intensive, I’m sure.

Happy thought inventory. With the world spiraling towards a global depression and people dying like flies, I’m pleased that my stock photos are selling as well as ever. I think stock photography may be a depression proof business. Not sure why but I’ll take it. Free money from my view of the road, as it’s all from work done in years past. All I have to do is deposit the cash and then figure out some way to blow it.

There’s nothing like the smell of freshly cut grass. It smells like, suburbia.

Supply status. Freshly stocked.

Weed inventory. Still fine.

Laundry status. Two loads done and folded. Now all I have to do is fetch it from the laundry room and stash it in the bedroom.

No first-responder activity to report.

The hunkering down continues.

Still alive and well here in Denver.

COVID-19 Hunker-down Log. Stardate 43920.39

Sunday (yesterday) was quiet here in Denver. Spent most of the day moving between the couch and back deck. Naps are becoming a staple activity. There’s not much else we can do at the moment. It’s a waiting game. Waiting for things to get worse, and they will, as the spread of the virus is not stoppable right now. Imaginary lines on a map, the National Guard, talking heads, none of it will change what is going to happen. Nobody is immune. The virus is going to sweep across the world and the tide of plague is just beginning to rise. Best to get one’s shit wired tight and hang on. Mother Earth is checking in and the cull has started.

Combating boredom. I played with a few photo editing software packages yesterday. Nothing too exciting. The software I’ve been using is doing the job and I’ve yet to find anything that compels me to want to change. It’s just something to do. There isn’t much in the way of new photos to edit anyway. Mostly shots in the yard trying to capture the mood of the moment.

Good news inventory. Bupkis.

Dog poop scooping. Nothing of interest here.

Weed inventory. 71 days. Great for nap preparation.

Toilet paper/paper towel inventory. Normal draw-down. Same number of butts, same number of hands.

Camera battery. 92% Got a few photos in yesterday.

Laundry status. Doing fine. I washed clothes last weekend and I’ve hardly dented them.

No reports of any additional friends or family being infected by the virus.

I’ve been watching the reports coming out the the Northeast US. Seems the New Yorkers are fleeing the confines of the city and flooding into the neighboring states. Thus all the talk about state level quarantines and such. Not impressed with the hatred a lot of people are showing towards people who just want to stay alive. A simplistic mindset, people don’t realize that everyone is in line for this. It’s just a question of when it’s your turn. I’m surprised to not hear talk of building walls along the New York border. The nation is going through a grief process.  Shock, denial, anger, bargaining, depression, testing, and acceptance. There used to only be 5 stages of grief. We’ve added two more so we can prolong the agony. Personally, I think I’m in the bargaining stage, maybe the depression stage. Who knows? What difference does it make? The bottom line is that all of us here are fully aware that we are elderly and more susceptible to succumbing to the virus. Trudy’s mom has the added benefit of knowing that she has two strong people guarding over her. Me and Trudy just have one another and that could be totally different in a matter of two weeks. Infected today, dead in two weeks. It’s a possibility.

First responder activity. Nothing to report.

The hunkering down continues, extra hunkering is in effect.

Still alive and well here in Denver.

COVID-19 Hunker-down Log. Stardate 43919.37

The snow has moved through. Yesterday was a sunny day, a bit on the chilly side with temperatures hovering around 50 degrees mid-day. Lots of porch time, lots of coffee.

Combating boredom. I spent part of the day working out how I want to continue writing this log file. I’ve decided to move the publishing platform to my WordPress blog rather than Facebook. By doing so, I am exposing the log to a much wider audience. If that’s good or bad I have no idea, I’ll eventually find out.

Good news inventory. It’s getting worse, not better I’m afraid. New York and the Northeast US is getting hit pretty hard right now. In the most densely populated areas, the virus is spreading rapidly. We still have a dozen or so remote counties here in Colorado that are not reporting infections or deaths. I wonder how long that will last. I’ve read that the number of infections across the country is roughly doubling every 3 days. I’ve also noticed that the death rate is creeping up to what is presently about 1.73% of infections. I read that it’s expected to level out at about 3%. That means for every 100 people infected, 3 will not make it. I’ll avoid further speculation, but until there are enough medical supplies in the right places and until there is a viable inoculation in place, it will continue to get worse. Since neither are in place at the moment, it’s like being in a Tsunami that is going to cover the world. What’s going to save you from it is your life raft. Trudy and I have the best life raft we can afford and so long as we stick to the game plan, we’ll ride it out.

Dog poop scooping. The snow is melted so we’re looking good.

Weed inventory. 72 day supply. We’re pretty much at a normal consumption rate here. Sitting around stoned all the time isn’t as entertaining as it was as a younger man. It’s not so much of an escape as it is a calming effect and I think we’ve found our “calm zone.”

Toilet paper/paper towel inventory. Plenty on hand. There’s a dark humor to this public rush to hoard supplies. I mean, c’mon, how many times a day does the average person have to wipe their butt?

Camera battery. 93%. I’m still keeping the camera on the kitchen table and at the ready. The real decision is what type of photos to take in order to document this. I’m still working on that.

Laundry status. Not accumulating at a rapid pace. Sweats are good for about 3-4 days. We’re saving a little money on laundry soap, that much is certain.

Still no word from Kentucky on the family member suspected of contracting the virus. The family member suffering from illness is self-quarantined and fighting through it, waiting patiently for the test results. If it takes this long to get an answer, it’s not a good situation. That means that testing is far behind the curve on this.

First-responder activity. Yep, we had a first responder event yesterday. Not virus related though. We were visited by a Denver police officer investigating a report of an explosion in a nearby neighborhood. While watching television yesterday afternoon, what sounded like an aerial bomb went off within a quarter of a mile from the house. It turns out to be a bunch of mindless kids having a party at their home while the parents were away and setting off a fireworks mortar round in the yard for shits and grins. Like, nobody would notice that. It scared the hell out of Trudy, the dogs and our neighbor. My guess is the kids are joking about it today, something to the effect of the humor of frightening old ladies and being too loud. Anyone with any sense knows that frightening old ladies isn’t normally going to win you any brownie points with the police or your neighbors. No injuries reported.

The unintended side effect of the police visit was we let someone into the house. We’ve enacted a protocol here that simply stated means, nobody comes in the house. We have a 93 year old and two other people over the age of 60 living here, so we are at higher risk of disaster if the virus makes it through the door. The cop was pretty good though, we all kept a little distance from each other and we wiped down everything he touched while here. If I’m not dead in two weeks, I’ll know it was okay.

We watched the 2017 movie “Unlocked” last night on cable. Very eerily on subject concerning epidemics. The movie is about terrorists planning to expose the country to a deadly viral epidemic. At one point in the movie they talked about how unprepared the government was to deal with this type of situation. So, when Donald Trump says “who could have known”, you can pretty much point to this and realize that everyone should have known as it was common knowledge and in the public discourse back in 2016 and 2017 when the movie was written and produced. This possibility hasn’t been a secret by any stretch of the imagination. Only someone who wasn’t paying attention wouldn’t have known. Good to know that our government isn’t paying attention to anything. You’re on your own folks.

The hunkering down continues, extra hunkering is in effect.

Still alive and well here in Denver.