COVID-19 Hunker-down Log. Stardate 44044.38

Combating boredom.

After having limped back to town with the bad transmission in my Ford Explorer, I’ve spent the last couple of days dealing with the after effects. We took the vehicle to the service department at our local dealer, where it appeared that they wouldn’t even be looking at it for a few days and God only knows how much longer and at what expense we’d incur getting it back. Not good. I picked it up at the dealer and took it to another shop, where they’ll be on the case Monday morning. The word is I’ll have it back a week from Monday, with a remanufactured (rebuilt) tranny. The report from the shop is that the gears were torn to shreds. I can’t really complain, the vehicle has 113,000 miles on it and a lot of those miles have been along dirt mountain roads. It’s been a good vehicle and has never left me on the side of the road, despite some close calls.

The wife is heading to the cabin today with her mother. We rented a midsized car for the week so she wouldn’t have to cancel her trip. The rental agency near the house gave us a Ford Focus that looked and ran like it had been seriously abused, and we asked to swap it out with something else. Problem solved. The Chevy Impala she now has is quite suitable for her needs. Can’t have a rental car breaking down on the highway while transporting Trudy’s 93 year old mother.

Thus the adventures in Auto-World this week. We should be back to normal in a week or so and I can get back to Northern Colorado to finish off the moose photography season.

Happy thought inventory.

A bachelor week coming up. Just me and the dogs.

Chemicals in the hot-tub have been checked and it’s ready for me to spend a few nights soaking beneath the stars.

Liking the new Lexus, glad we have a new car in the garage. That should cut down on the repair bills for a while.

Slacker status.

No slackers encountered today. I’m seeing a bit of a shift in public attitude about the severity and reality of the Pandemic. Can’t wish it away and delusional thinking doesn’t solve any problems.

No first-responder activity to report.

The hunkering down continues.

Still alive and well here in Denver.

COVID-19 Hunker-down Log. Stardate 44042.64

Combating boredom.

Moose interruptus. My trip into Mooseville was cut short when an alarm light (wrench) illuminated in my dash board. A quick peek at the owners manual, yep, it’s not good. Drive train failure. It wasn’t difficult to identify the most likely cause, as the transmission was emitting a loud and vibrating “thunk” when it shifted to high gear. Trip cut short without notice. I limped back to Denver trying to take the route with the fewest known stops. Wouldn’t have mattered though, I-25 southbound to Denver was a stop and go parking lot from Ft. Collins to North Denver, a quick 75 miles of driving hell.

Oh well, it wasn’t the first time in my life that I was interrupted doing something that I really didn’t want to stop doing. One just plans another attempt.

Happy thought inventory.

I did manage two good moose runs this week. Lots of good photographs. Another attempt is in the queue.

Doobie sure seems to need my attention today. Doobie Love!

Slacker status.

No slackers encountered today. On a side note, I do enjoy seeing videos of said slackers. It reminds me that I’m not alone in this world having to contend with slackers. I’m far less obnoxious towards these people though. I just try to keep everyone at distance with a 10 ft. pole.

No first-responder activity to report.

The hunkering down continues.

Still alive and well here in Denver.

COVID-19 Hunker-down Log. Stardate 44040.25

Combating boredom.

It has been a busy week here in Colorado. I’m heading back to Northern Colorado for another few days of moose photography. It’s prime-time now for the moose. I’ve made three trips into the wilderness so far this summer and the escape from hunkering down has been a life saver. Not knowing how long this pandemic is going to keep a lid on activity, I’ve got to take advantage of my opportunities while they last.

I did manage to get a photograph of the Neowise comet that’s been in our night skies for the past month or so. Clouds have kept it obscured but I’ve persevered and managed a pleasant evening together with the wife sitting by one of the local lakes on Sunday evening. Success, finally!

Happy thought inventory.

A few days at the cabin, sitting on the deck, spending quiet time with my girl, exploring the wilderness with the camera. My favorite time of year.

Slacker status.

No slackers encountered today.

No first-responder activity to report.

The hunkering down continues.

Still alive and well here in Denver.

The Bird is the Word

Juvenile Coopers Hawk

The abrupt arrival of the Coronavirus Pandemic has certainly put a damper on the ability of many photographers to maintain a high level of work flow this year and my photography life has been no exception.

I’ve cancelled many scheduled photography outings this year and it’s likely this pandemic will continue on into 2021. As a result I’ve had to retrain my thinking and activity as it’s simply impossible for me to go more than a few days without pushing a shutter button.

Looking over my Lightroom stock photography catalog for the year to date, and I see a lot of bird photos. As a matter of fact, 75% of my stock photos this year are bird shots.

So with that in mind, I thought I’d share a few bird photos from this year’s bird adventures.

Male house finch taking off from the garden plant hanger.
This bald eagle photograph was taken in February at Rocky Mountain Arsenal NWR.

February is a prime month for catching nesting eagles.
Mallard Drake flapping in a lake near my home in early March.

I’m always pleased to get a good duck photo. They are regular sellers as stock photos.
Nesting Great Blue Heron begin arriving in the suburbs in late February.

This image of a Heron heading from the nest was taken in early March.
April photo of a Black-capped Chickadee taking a drink of water from my garden birdbath.

I always like to get nice clear depictive photos of birds. These shots turn up in books, magazines and web sites. Nothing dramatic, just a good look of the birds physical features is all I’m hoping for.

A Ruby-throated Hummingbird on approach to the garden feeder. Taken in May of this year.

The good ole standby humming bird feeder is often an attraction for a few shots. It always surprises me to discover the variety of species that show up for a free meal.
Sandhill Cranes during the Spring migration in Monte Vista, Colorado.

Typically, I travel to Monte Vista each March to get photographs of the annual Sandhill Crane migration. This year my trip occurred as the Pandemic was just getting underway. If I had waited any longer, it wouldn’t have been possible to make this trip.

Here it is late July and I continue to scratch out photos despite having a seriously curtailed travel schedule. The beauty of bird photography is that I can go just about anywhere near the house and find a variety of feathered friends to photograph. I’ve accumulated at least 10,000 bird photos through July, and there are more to take. I’ll continue scouring the local lakes and ponds looking for that next stock photo to add to the portfolio. Bird photography is a great way of getting out without all the hassles of crowds and expense of overnight travel. It simply requires the correct motivation to change course and the ability adapt to the environment we live in.

So grab your camera and head to the local pond. The birds are waiting for you.