Colorado Landscape Photographer Gary Gray
Georgetown Loop NGRR

It is “Train Tuesday” isn’t it?

I’ll use this photo as the example shot for today’s blog post.

For the amateur photographer looking to better understand compositions in landscape photography.

There’s a concept called “Previsualization” photography gurus often preach.

There’s another concept I call “revisualization.”

Previsualization in essence is thinking about what your photo is going to look like before you actually see it and make the image. Previsualize your scene, when you see the required elements you have something to work from because it’s recognizable. It works, if you have capacity for abstract thought. All abstract thought ability mileage varies from photographer to photographer though.

Revisualization is different from all that, but it plays into previsualization as a precursor.

I often challenge myself to shooting with “one camera, one lens” for a day of heavy photography. This forces me to use that lens exclusively for an extended period of time and learn exactly how it will perform on that body and in general on other bodies in dynamic situations.

My first choice in lenses for this exercise are prime lenses. For example, the blog photograph today was taken with a Canon EOS 1Ds MKII using the EF 50mm f/1.4 during one of my photography workshops. I shot with the above mentioned camera/lens combination that entire day. My physical location was determined by the position my client wanted to be in. I was there to assist, not do my own thing. I get the shot I take once the assistance isn’t needed. Now I’m in a position not of my choosing, with a fixed camera/lens and I have to find a shot at the last second.

A fixed camera/lens combination automatically takes you out of your comfort zone because it removes the possibility of certain types of shots. You’ll often find that you have to compose a shot on the fly and it’s not necessarily the previsualized scene you had in mind. A couple hundred of frames in, if you’re learning anything, you’ll literally get the picture.

When it’s all said and done, you could wind up with some really nice photos you may not have thought of if you had brought that big super-zoom instead.

Getting out of your comfort zone is a good way to learn.

Try it, you’ll like it.